Looking for Volunteers....

The Union County Rape Crisis Center is looking for dedicated individuals who are interested in helping survivors of sexual violence.  Our next Advocate training is slated to take place in the spring of 2015. Please keep an eye out for upcoming dates.

What are the requirements?
  • Resident of Union County
  • 18 years of age or older
  • Valid U.S. driver's license
  • Personal (own) means of transportation (i.e. a car)
  • Participation in an informal interview during business hours of 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
  • Successful completion of Advocate training which includes attendance at all sessions
  • Commitment to volunteer for a period of at least one year
  • Commitment to signing up for at least three hotline shifts per month
  • Regular attendance at monthly volunteer meetings (evening)

*If you meet these requirements and are interested in interviewing, kindly phone us at (908) 233-7273 or email rcc@ucnj.org.

2014 Summer Advocate Graduates

2014 Summer Advocate Graduates

Outreach Event

Outreach Event

Advocate of the Month

Advocate of the Month
Leslie O-T
For more than a year I have been a Confidential Sexual Violence Advocate for the Union County Rape Crisis Center and I believe that the experience has changed my life. The Rape Crisis Center provides services to survivors, family members and loved ones of victims of sexual assault and domestic violence. I chose to volunteer for the UCRCC because I was drawn to their goal of creating a violence free community. They serve the community through consultation, support and education to eliminate intolerance to all forms of interpersonal violence. In my professional life in health care, I serve patients at times when they are most vulnerable- guiding them through the management and resolution of medical illnesses. As a volunteer for the UCRCC, my role is quite similar. Survivors contact the Center because they are in pain or crisis, have ongoing concerns or have questions about the resources that are available to them.

Volunteering for the UCRCC feeds my soul. It is my way of giving back and recognizing all of the blessings I have received. In addition to learning the physical and emotional difficulties faced by survivors of sexual harassment and violence, my training to become a Confidential Sexual Violence Advocate taught me a great many things about myself, and forever changed how I navigate the world and my surroundings. During conversations with friends or colleagues I find myself listening for subtle clues that might hint at some prior traumatic event or I may simply discuss my advocacy with them in order to initiate a dialogue. All in all, I believe I have become a better listener both in my personal and my professional life.

Sexual molestation and assault touches everyone. There are no racial, social, or economic barriers to this type of victimization nor are there specific time limits during which a survivor becomes completely healed, if ever. Likewise, family members, spouses, significant others, coworkers and acquaintances are also left to handle the sequelae of the assault. These relationships may become strained, as they, too, bear the burdens of this traumatic event. Resolution most often requires a patient, understanding, empathetic ear. The victim must be allowed to regain a lost sense of control while being guided toward options and resources.

Solutions to the problem of sexual violence specifically, and misogyny in general, may be hard to come by- but awareness of the scope of the problem and an exploration of its origins may prove helpful. Trouble begins insidiously- during play, youth may find it fun to cajole or coerce each other into unwelcomed touching or horseplay, teenaged boys may habitually use derogatory or overtly sexualized slang as a show of manhood to their buddies, husbands may see their wives as property, perhaps as a misinterpretation of religious doctrine, and coworkers may view forms of sexual harassment as a normal part of the work environment. Change may seem elusive but I believe that it is possible, even if it involves one person, one small group, one office, one auditorium or one piece of legislation at a time.