October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

The Overlap Between Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault

Sexual violence refers to crimes like sexual assault, rape, and sexual abuse. Domestic violence,  or Intimate Parter Violence (IPV) involves an intentional pattern of physical, emotional, economic, and other tactics used to instill fear and to coerce intimate partners to act against their own will or best interests. Sexual assault is often part of this pattern of abuse as perpetrators who are physically violent towards their intimate partners are often sexually abusive as well.

Victims who are both physically and sexually abused have a higher likelihood to be injured or killed than victims who experience one form of abuse. Sexual and domestic violence perpetrators do not discriminate between gender, race, age, social class, culture, or ethnicity. Partners who are disabled, pregnant, or attempting to leave their abusers are at greatest risk for intimate partner rape.

If you or a loved one has been affected by IPV, please reach out to our domestic violence prevention counterpart, YWCA of Union County. They can be reached at their 24-hour hotline at 908-355-HELP (4357). For additional information, you can click their logo, below, to be directed to their website.



October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

Domestic violence, or intimate partner violence (IPV), affects millions and does not discriminate amongst gender, race, relation, culture, or status. It’s not just physical -- it’s yelling, humiliation, stalking, manipulation, coercion, threats and isolation. It’s taking control of finances, keeping tabs on internet activity, non-stop texting, constant use the silent treatment, or calling someone stupid so often they believe it.

Nearly three out of four Americans personally know someone who is or has been a victim of domestic violence. Now is time to take a stand with allies across Union County. Support survivors and speak out against domestic violence all month long.

If you or a loved one has been affected by IPV, please reach out to our domestic violence prevention counterpart, YWCA of Union County. They can be reached at their 24-hour hotline at 908-355-HELP (4357). For additional information, you can click their logo, below, to be directed to their website.

UCRCC Spotlight: CSVA, Taisha

UCRCC Spotlight:
Confidential
Sexual Violence
Advocate, Taisha H.




What inspired you to become a CSVA?
From the moment I saw the announcement looking for volunteers I knew it was something I wanted to do. I experienced sexual violence in my life and wanted to be able to help others in their time of need.
 
What was the training like in comparison to the reality of serving survivors?
Training helped give me the tools to assist survivors. The tools learned during training, along with flexibility and thinking on your feet, help address additional safety concerns and other factors a caller may have.  

What is your goal in serving survivors? Particularly, what unique qualities do you identify within yourself to assist you in serving survivors?
My goal with any call is to be a source of support and encouragement for survivors and/or significant others. Sometimes a caring ear is enough to give survivors the space they need to acknowledge their feelings or make difficult decisions.

Why do you think advocacy for those affected by sexual violence is so important?
Survivors may not always know where to turn. We help give survivors and significant others information, resources and options they may not have otherwise known.

Do you have anything you’d like to share with people thinking about volunteering with the UCRCC?
I would encourage anyone thinking of volunteering to absolutely take that leap. It can be scary but it is incredibly rewarding.

Is there anything you’d specifically like to share with the people reading this ?
The volunteers I serve with are some of the most caring and compassionate people I have ever met. It takes a big heart to do this work and I cannot express how proud I am to be part of this amazing group.

Thank You to Our CSVAs

"Our Comfort Kit"

2020 has been an impactful year and we at the Union County Rape Crisis Center wanted to extend a token of gratitude to our volunteers who continued to provide support to survivors of sexual violence throughout our county via our 24/7 hotlines.  Our token of gratitude  was a self-care package we called “Our Comfort Kit”; like the comfort kits we provide survivors, “Our Comfort Kit” contained items geared toward personal care (self-aid).


“Our Comfort Kit” included self-care items to further reiterate how important it is to take care of yourself, especially since our team gives so much to their loved ones and the community. 

To our CSVA team—THANK YOU :)